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Author Topic: Introducing Pheasants to the wild  (Read 8206 times)
deadeye1
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« on: August 09, 2004, 12:37:44 AM »

In have about 17  8 month old pheasants and would like to know at what age is the best time to send them out on their own for best survival.Ther are plenty of insects here for them to feed on 30 acres of weed fields and  1000 acres of surronded farm land with ditches and a few ponds.Dave
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muttsburg
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2004, 02:04:03 AM »

Hi

Mine went into the flight pen at 3 weeks and released at 7 weeks. The younger the better, the older they are the harder it is to establish themselves before winter.

Mine come back daily to suppliment their diet and I'll continue to set food out as long as they need it but they eat very little of what is offered.

Are you going to just open the pens to let them go or are you going to take them away from the coop? I find they come back easily if you just open the pen doors.

There are several threads on this subject here, check them out  :wink:
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deadeye1
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2004, 06:19:46 PM »

When the pheasants come back,do they roost in the pen for the night and then leave in the morning.I was afraid predators would get them as there is nobody there to lock the door as we have lost most of our quail to predators around the pen.We released 20 quail a couple hours b/4 sun set in a covey base camp 2 weeks ago and another 20 this last week end in another base camp and they seem to be doing fine and look in better shape than the ones we have in the pen.The base camps are covered to keep the food dry (mixture of flight conditioner,cracked corn,wheat and milo)and hanging 7inches off the ground to keep rodents away.The camps are i/4mile away from the pens they were raised in.One on the east side,the other on the west side.So far they havnt come to the home pen.I wonder if that will work the same way with pheasants,But i believe this year we will release right from the pen as this is our first time with pheasants.Thanks for the info on the release age as that is the age that i had in mind.Deadeye
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deadeye1
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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2004, 12:30:16 AM »

Quote from: deadeye1
When the pheasants come back,do they roost in the pen for the night and then leave in the morning.I was afraid predators would get them as there is nobody there to lock the door as we have lost most of our quail to predators around the pen.We released 20 quail a couple hours b/4 sun set in a covey base camp 2 weeks ago and another 20 this last week end in another base camp and they seem to be doing fine and look in better shape than the ones we have in the pen.The base camps are covered to keep the food dry (mixture of flight conditioner,cracked corn,wheat and milo)and hanging 7inches off the ground to keep rodents away.The camps are i/4mile away from the pens they were raised in.One on the east side,the other on the west side.So far they havnt come to the home pen.I wonder if that will work the same way with pheasants,But i believe this year we will release right from the pen as this is our first time with pheasants.Thanks for the info on the release age as that is the age that i had in mind.Deadeye
I live 100 miles from the flight pen and coop and me or my son check on them once a week to refill the feeders and we use the nipple watering system so they don't comtaminate the water with fecas.Deadeye
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muttsburg
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2004, 12:44:40 AM »

They only visit during the day, they roost in the woods at night. I lock up the pen at night to keep the coons out of the feeders and to keep the pheasants out. I agree with your idea that they shouldn't roost in the pen with the door open because they would be trapped if there was hungry critters around.

We turned out our 42 quail about 300 yrds from the pen but some had imprinted with the sound of our rooster crowing and 5 came home, the others have spread out to the neighboring farms in small covies.  :-)

We are building a feeder near the pen for winter time with an electric fence around it to keep out the coons (on a timer we shouldn't have to worry about fried pheasant or quail or forgetting to turn it off during the day)

We are really enjoying watching the ringnecks color up. We will probably not see much of them once they are grown and that's a good thing, but in the meantime we'll enjoy them.
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CharlieHorse
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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2004, 06:00:46 PM »

I must agree with muttsburg.......the younger, the better.  I have seen Ringneck pheasants released on a couple of occasions at around 3-6 months old and the only thing that I think they are doing is feeding the critters. I can chase them down the road for a mile before they move out from front of the car. Have seen many out in the woods/feilds and they don't have a whole lot of a "wild" streak in them at all. Have spotted some in december while hunting and I could catch them with a net, even after they've been "out" on there own for over 6 months. I release my BW quail at 5 weeks and they have done very well, of course the pheasants mature at a different age I'm sure.

Good Luck
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muttsburg
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2004, 10:54:59 PM »

Your right trailbossusa, the pheasant are much slower. There was no sign of adult feathers at 7 wk. Only the hint of the red sheilds around the eyes and just a hint of the spur knobs on the legs.

Good thing was  that at this age they were extreemly spooky. They have become more calm coming into the yard every day and think nothing of my dog or female cat walking right up to them so I started letting my other cat out daily for a few hrs. This has put them back into a more realistic frame of mind. Gizmo is declawed but a very good hunter. He just can't seem to get a good hold on the pheasants so he is our "Education Director"   :shock:  They are 5 months old now and I'm looking forward to the day one of those roosts turns on him.

I have watched them in the woods and fields and they are very spooky where they need to be. Probably why we haven't lost any yet.
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deadeye1
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2004, 12:31:07 AM »

Quote from: deadeye1
Quote from: deadeye1
When the pheasants come back,do they roost in the pen for the night and then leave in the morning.I was afraid predators would get them as there is nobody there to lock the door as we have lost most of our quail to predators around the pen.We released 20 quail a couple hours b/4 sun set in a covey base camp 2 weeks ago and another 20 this last week end in another base camp and they seem to be doing fine and look in better shape than the ones we have in the pen.The base camps are covered to keep the food dry (mixture of flight conditioner,cracked corn,wheat and milo)and hanging 7inches off the ground to keep rodents away.The camps are i/4mile away from the pens they were raised in.One on the east side,the other on the west side.So far they havnt come to the home pen.I wonder if that will work the same way with pheasants,But i believe this year we will release right from the pen as this is our first time with pheasants.Thanks for the info on the release age as that is the age that i had in mind.Deadeye
I live 100 miles from the flight pen and coop and me or my son check on them once a week to refill the feeders and we use the nipple watering system so they don't comtaminate the water with fecas.Deadeye
WHOOPS,I made a mistake on the age of the pheasants.They are 7 weeks old instead of 7 months.
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deadeye1
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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2004, 12:41:31 AM »

I plan on turning them loose right from the pen on august 21st they will be about nine weeks old and like you said they feather out later than quail do.The roosters are starting to get red around the eyes.The last time i was at our place i spotted a wild covey of pheasants the same age as our pheasants along the road at the edge of a soy bean field.Sure was nice to see some wild birds as pheasants are rare around here,or should i say sparsely populated.I never see any while i am hunting quail during hunting seasons.Dave
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muttsburg
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« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2004, 12:43:35 AM »

Sounds like they are ready to go. Are you going to relocate them or just oprn the pen?  Seems that being that far away they would do better just being locked out. 7 weeks is the perfect age.
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muttsburg
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« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2004, 12:46:35 AM »

Humm, posting at the same time, sorry.

They will probably do fine.
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