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Author Topic: bobwhite quail - curled toes  (Read 18393 times)
classroom quailer
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« on: May 08, 2008, 09:38:40 AM »

This is my first bobwhite quail hatch and we've had very good hatching success.  Of our original 28 eggs, 20 have successfully hatched.  I'm noticing that some of the late hatchers have curled feet/toes.  They seem to be walking around on their elbows.  Is there anything I can do to help them out?  Thanks!
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Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2008, 09:42:19 AM »

I would suggest removing them from the rest and either cull them out or try to tape there toes flat.

Steve
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Specializing in Manchurian Ring-necked Pheasants and Melanistic Mutant Pheasants for release, propagation and the hunting community. Licensed by the State of WV. DNR# D6-42-23-GF1
GSP4
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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2008, 09:54:28 AM »

I would suggest removing them from the rest and either cull them out or try to tape there toes flat.

Steve
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Pheasant Hollow Farm what would you use that wouldn't be to heavy?
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Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2008, 10:14:32 AM »

I would suggest removing them from the rest and either cull them out or try to tape there toes flat.

Steve
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Pheasant Hollow Farm what would you use that wouldn't be to heavy?

Use the thin flat tooth picks and cellophane tape. Make it like a splint. I just think that it is to much trouble to even attempt it.

More then likely these birds where helped out of the shell.


I use to do this in the beginning of my raising of pheasants. 7 years ago. I found that when birds are help either out of the shell or late late hatch, more then likely they are splade legs or curled toes. 99.9% of these birds never make it. If they do, they are the runts and only last maybe 2-3 weeks at most in the general population.

It's good practice if you want to try. I just cull them, I don't help any out of the shells either. If they die trying, well then it was ment to be that way.

Steve
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NH/Pete
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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2008, 10:18:20 AM »

I would cull them out also.
Tough thing to do but needs to be done.
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classroom quailer
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« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2008, 10:30:10 AM »

They are a late, late hatch... they were not helped out of the shell.  Since this is a third grade classroom experiment, I think we'll try taping the tiny feet and see how they make it...   
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GSP4
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« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2008, 10:38:51 AM »

thanks for the info, I may help them out of the shell some but after that thier on thier own :grin:

classroom quailer  Good luck with them, hope it works out  :?:

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Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2008, 10:39:36 AM »

They are a late, late hatch... they were not helped out of the shell.  Since this is a third grade classroom experiment, I think we'll try taping the tiny feet and see how they make it...   

Good luck with it.. let us know how well they do.

Steve
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2008, 08:52:30 AM »

low temperature in incubator!
had same problem at begining....
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2008, 09:23:31 AM »

The curled toe will not hurt the bird and usually will not handycap it in anyway unless it is an. extreme case that effects the whole foot and leg. No big deal to just leave it alone most will get along just fine. if it is a severe case then just cull it as Steve said...I really do not think that it is caused by low temp.. I get a few with every hatch...
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2008, 09:31:27 AM »

my chicks have curled leggs ,quails mostly,when i have electricity fails in winter over 2 hour!few days ago have chickens in incubator,temp was little low(new old incubator and new thermostat so i must do some tests),temp was about 35.5°C,chickens get out 3 days later and 3 or 4 had curled leggs!
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Reeves
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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2008, 09:38:36 AM »

There are a number of reasons this can happen, including genetics.
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komer
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« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2008, 09:48:56 AM »

must agree with you Reeves
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classroom quailer
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« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2008, 09:17:47 AM »

Here's an update on the curly-toed quail...   We had four with curly toes.  I did try to tape their tiny feet - unsuccessfully.  We just decided to keep them in a seperate cage so the others wouldn't pick on them or run them over.  Of the 4, 3 had perished (of natural causes) within 3 days - despite our efforts.  One remained, so we introduced him into the the rest of the herd.  His toes were the least curled and seem to get better as he gets bigger.  He is still alive and doing well, though he is noticeably smaller that the others and delayed in maturing.  But, he holds his own with the rest.  We call him "Curly".   It's been a great life lesson for my third graders!  Thanks for all your help...
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bkvail
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« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2009, 10:38:52 PM »

I have a Coturnix that has curled feet - he was the last to hatch about 24 hours after most of the others.  I see that it might be not the best idea to try to 'fix' it.  Can someone PM me how to cull it?  I have culled rabbits that had problems, but they are a lot larger - even the babies are not this small.  I had to cull an adult rabbit the other day from a broken back, so I'm not squeamish, just want to do the right thing.  I don't want to see it suffer.  It's not getting around well and the others are picking on it.  It can't even keep itself upright because the whole foot is curled inward.
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