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Author Topic: Incubation and Humidity  (Read 20214 times)
Reeves
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« on: July 13, 2007, 07:03:16 PM »

Incubator Environment

A.   Temperature

    Temperature is the most critical factor in the hatchability of eggs. In forced-draft machines, the temperature should be between 99 and 100f (37 and 38C) with a mean setting of 99.5f (37.5C). In still-air machines, the temperature taken at the top of the egg should be about 102f (39C); care should be taken that the temperature does not exceed 103f (40C). The lowest temperature (or physiological zero) for the egg development has been determined to be about 68f (20C); the highest temperature is about 109f (43C).

B.   Humidity Requirements

    Humidity is important because it controls the evaporation of water from the egg and maintains the proper physiochemical equilibrium among the various egg constituents. High humidity seals the pores of the egg shell and prevents proper exchange of gasses and can lead to asphyxiation of the embryo. Low humidity permits excessive evaporation of the egg contents and retards development of the embryo. The normal relative humidity for the incubation of pheasant, partridge, and quail eggs is about 46 percent. In a constant forced-air machine, pheasant and partridge eggs develope best if exposed to a wet-bulb reading of 82f (28C) during incubation and a temperature of about 90f (32C) in the hatcher. Quail generally require a higher humidity at the beginning of incubation, 86f (30C) wet bulb and about 90f (32C) wet bulb in the hatcher (Table 6-2). Refer to figure 6-3 for converting wet-bulb readings (degrees Fahrenheit) to relative humidity (percent).

Fig 6-2


Fig 6-3
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007, 07:47:38 AM by Reeves » Logged
Reeves
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« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2007, 07:43:10 PM »

Hatching

    As hatching is done at a higher humidity and lower temperature than incubation, a separate hatcher is usually required. A glass or transparent front or top of the hatcher will assist in monitoring the hatch without disturbing the hatching environment. The hatcher should operate at 98.5f (37c) with a wet bulb at 90c to 92f (32.2c-33.4c) or higher. A high humidity is helpful for slightly softening the egg shell membrane, making pipping and escape easier. The lower temperature reflects the additional heat being generated by the chick as it prepares for pipping and changes over from amniotic to pulmonary breathing. Some operators sprinkle the egg with warm water during the transfer from incubator to hatcher. This gives the egg a start by slightly softening the shell membrane.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2007, 01:16:33 PM by Reeves » Logged
Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2007, 12:37:57 AM »

Wet bulb is exactly what it states. It is the temperature relative of the humidity in degrees. A  Hygrometer Wick is placed over the stem of the thermometer and the other end of the sleeve is placed in the water pan. The same thermometer can be used for wet bulb or checking incubator temps. This is what I have in my GQF 1502 Sportsman incubator.
I have two of them instead of the one. This way I can view the wet bulb temp and the incubator temp the same time

Steve
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Specializing in Manchurian Ring-necked Pheasants and Melanistic Mutant Pheasants for release, propagation and the hunting community. Licensed by the State of WV. DNR# D6-16-16-GF1
Reeves
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2007, 01:19:36 PM »

Had to be a typo. I re-read the book & it doesn't match any other numbers. So I edit that post.
Sorry ! I should have caught it when first typed it out !

re temps between eggs. Temperatures should be taken no higher than top of eggs. You may want to tweek it down a bit, or at least next time.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2007, 01:24:15 PM by Reeves » Logged
wildergamebirds
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2008, 02:43:30 AM »

  About a hundred years ago, I promised to post links to a humidity/wet bulb conversion calculator.  Here are five, plus, one that has several other calculators, also.

  http://www.wtoctv.com/Global/category.asp?C=10666

  http://www.csgnetwork.com/dewptrelhumcalc.html

  http://www.abc15.com/content/weather/calculators/wetbulb_drybulb.aspx

  http://www.the-snowman.com/wetbulb.html

  http://www.johnsnhweather.com/wetbulb.html

  http://www.pipingnews.com/psychrom.htm

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MR.Dreamlandbird
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My homeade incubator.

« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2008, 04:29:04 AM »

very helpful!!!!! j41
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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2008, 11:12:00 PM »

Reeves,      When I take quail eggs out of pen and put them in sand box in area at 60-70 degrees do I put them small end down like in incubator or on side? Think I have that streight. I have seen this posted before, just easier to ask than look up.
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Reeves
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« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2008, 07:59:48 AM »

You need to read the egg storage info again (in Before Incubation)  :angel:

70f is too hot. Dry sand for storage is not great: may dry out eggs too fast.
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just ducky
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« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2008, 01:00:04 PM »

Incubator Environment

A.   Temperature

    Temperature is the most critical factor in the hatchability of eggs. In forced-draft machines, the temperature should be between 99 and 100f (37 and 38C) with a mean setting of 99.5f (37.5C). In still-air machines, the temperature taken at the top of the egg should be about 102f (39C); care should be taken that the temperature does not exceed 103f (40C). The lowest temperature (or physiological zero) for the egg development has been determined to be about 68f (20C); the highest temperature is about 109f (43C).

B.   Humidity Requirements

    Humidity is important because it controls the evaporation of water from the egg and maintains the proper physiochemical equilibrium among the various egg constituents. High humidity seals the pores of the egg shell and prevents proper exchange of gasses and can lead to asphyxiation of the embryo. Low humidity permits excessive evaporation of the egg contents and retards development of the embryo. The normal relative humidity for the incubation of pheasant, partridge, and quail eggs is about 46 percent. In a constant forced-air machine, pheasant and partridge eggs develope best if exposed to a wet-bulb reading of 82f (28C) during incubation and a temperature of about 90f (32C) in the hatcher. Quail generally require a higher humidity at the beginning of incubation, 86f (30C) wet bulb and about 90f (32C) wet bulb in the hatcher (Table 6-2). Refer to figure 6-3 for converting wet-bulb readings (degrees Fahrenheit) to relative humidity (percent).

Fig 6-2


Fig 6-3


Will these temps work for turkey and duck eggs as well?        s144    Thanks for your help!
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Just Ducky
Reeves
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« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2008, 03:29:37 PM »

Off the top of my head, not sure about Turkeys.
Unlikely to work for Ducks.
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« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2008, 10:28:29 PM »

My incubator jumped from 46% to 60% humidity today. I pulled the plug hoping it would drop but  with the humidity in the air being about 60% also it's not going down. they're not supposed to hatch until the 2nd. Any suggestions to lower the humidity without losing heat? s85
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Mark
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What do you mean I have to press 1 for english.

« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2008, 01:16:07 AM »

If you want to lower it take water out...but as close as you are to hatching NO matter....
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Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #12 on: June 28, 2008, 03:02:45 AM »

I agree with slider. Just let it ride..

Steve
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« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2008, 07:06:25 AM »

thanks. I,ll wait and see.
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Mark
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« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2008, 08:52:47 AM »

all worked out well. Right on schedule 12 of the 15 fertile eggs hatched. Two others pipped but never made it out. the last one never hatched. Doing well. they're 1 wk old now
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