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Author Topic: Surragator  (Read 12459 times)
popsjp
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« on: April 09, 2007, 07:41:33 AM »

Hello everyone, I am new to the forum and new to the Quail.  Have read some great information on the site.  My question .... Have any of you used the surragator from "quail restoration tech."? I have a small place in central Texas that I am going to try it on. Would sure like to hear do's and don't before starting in May. The drought in that area the last 2 years has really taken its tole on the quail, hoping I can give them a jump start on recovering with this thing. Thanks J. P.
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gsc
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2007, 07:17:42 PM »

While I have not used one, the reports I have heard have not been good.

If you have drought problems, that would concern me.  Is the habitat able to sustain the quail?  Water, feed and cover?
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popsjp
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« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2007, 03:42:20 PM »

There are three surface ponds on the property. Habitat is an ongoing improvement. Over the last year brush piles and half cutting of the trees. Food plots and native grasses have been planted and will continue. There are some deer feeders and quail feeders across the property. I have some nipple waters and will be building some waters and placing with some feeders around the release sites, with brush piles. Anything else that you could suggest?  J. P.
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JohnInDixon
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2007, 03:58:16 PM »

Here is a link to the some information Missouri has about its restoration progam for quail.

Hopefully it might help you not re-invent the wheel.


http://www.mdc.mo.gov/landown/wild/quail/

John
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popsjp
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2007, 04:14:51 PM »

Thanks John, some good information.  I have been reading and trying to develope my game plan for over a year now. Mother Nature hasn't exactly been helping. J. P. Gregory
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AA Plantation
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« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2007, 03:47:02 PM »

All It is a Recall Pen that my father has been building for over 40 years. I started building them about 15 years ago and used them as a covey base camp type deal with no funnel.
with a brooder system in it  You can Build your own for a fraction of the cost
3 sheets ply-wood 8 2x4s and some hardware cloth. regular light recepticals and brooder lights are a lot cheaper than a LP system
« Last Edit: June 16, 2007, 05:46:33 PM by AA Plantation » Logged
popsjp
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2007, 10:18:55 AM »

I started my program May 19 and think it will be good after I learn the do's and don'ts. Started with 125 day old bw chicks. Lost about half the first week. This is due to the baby chicks not being able to reach the bottom of the feed trough. No losses since they have grown some. The heater is a thermostatically controlled propane system, the waterer is gravity flow nipple system. It is basically a brooder on one side and a open pen one the other side that can be divided.
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BigD_N_Cherokee
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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2007, 05:26:09 PM »

J.P.

We are on almost the same schedule as you.  Three of my buddies and I built four of these surrogators based on the QRT original out of 24 ga metal and expanded metal.  They turned out really well.
We built our nipple waterers from nipples purchased at FarmTek.com and PVC pipe. 

We built our LP heaters from Gas Valves purchased off the internet.  (Couldn't find an extension cord long enough or a receptacle to put it in where we have the boxes.)

The only thing we are doing a little different is taking day old birds and putting them in a brooderhouse for 2 weeks so we can make sure everything goes well.  Then we put the two week old birds in the surrogator boxes.  We band the the birds before releasing them.

We placed our first batch of 2 wk old birds in on May 14.  We have the second batch in the brooder house right now and will put them in when we release the surrogator birds.

One of my buddies already released half his birds the other day hoping they would stay around the ones that remained in the box while finding the water and food around it.  Then when the rest are released their buddies can show them where the groceries and drinks are.

So far we've learned that we need to:
1.  Grind the feed and place it on saucers the first week or two.
2.  Medicate the water.
3.  Monitor the heat in the surrogator

On the first batch we just lifted the divider about four inches and let them go back and forth.  The divider helped keep some of the heat in the box when we opened it partially.

We hope to release 4 separate batches from each box between now and Sept. 23.

We are learning as we go.  Can't believe it's so addictive.

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Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2007, 05:48:41 PM »

J.P.

We are on almost the same schedule as you.  Three of my buddies and I built four of these surrogators based on the QRT original out of 24 ga metal and expanded metal.  They turned out really well.
We built our nipple waterers from nipples purchased at FarmTek.com and PVC pipe. 

We built our LP heaters from Gas Valves purchased off the internet.  (Couldn't find an extension cord long enough or a receptacle to put it in where we have the boxes.)

The only thing we are doing a little different is taking day old birds and putting them in a brooderhouse for 2 weeks so we can make sure everything goes well.  Then we put the two week old birds in the surrogator boxes.  We band the the birds before releasing them.

We placed our first batch of 2 wk old birds in on May 14.  We have the second batch in the brooder house right now and will put them in when we release the surrogator birds.

One of my buddies already released half his birds the other day hoping they would stay around the ones that remained in the box while finding the water and food around it.  Then when the rest are released their buddies can show them where the groceries and drinks are.

So far we've learned that we need to:
1.  Grind the feed and place it on saucers the first week or two.
2.  Medicate the water.
3.  Monitor the heat in the surrogator

On the first batch we just lifted the divider about four inches and let them go back and forth.  The divider helped keep some of the heat in the box when we opened it partially.

We hope to release 4 separate batches from each box between now and Sept. 23.

We are learning as we go.  Can't believe it's so addictive.



When you really get into it start thinking about a second job or a second mortgage!

Steve
Pheasant Hollow Farm
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Specializing in Manchurian Ring-necked Pheasants and Melanistic Mutant Pheasants for release, propagation and the hunting community. Licensed by the State of WV. DNR# D6-16-16-GF1
rsolis
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2007, 05:59:50 PM »

J.P.

We are on almost the same schedule as you.  Three of my buddies and I built four of these surrogators based on the QRT original out of 24 ga metal and expanded metal.  They turned out really well.
We built our nipple waterers from nipples purchased at FarmTek.com and PVC pipe. 

We built our LP heaters from Gas Valves purchased off the internet.  (Couldn't find an extension cord long enough or a receptacle to put it in where we have the boxes.)

The only thing we are doing a little different is taking day old birds and putting them in a brooderhouse for 2 weeks so we can make sure everything goes well.  Then we put the two week old birds in the surrogator boxes.  We band the the birds before releasing them.

We placed our first batch of 2 wk old birds in on May 14.  We have the second batch in the brooder house right now and will put them in when we release the surrogator birds.

One of my buddies already released half his birds the other day hoping they would stay around the ones that remained in the box while finding the water and food around it.  Then when the rest are released their buddies can show them where the groceries and drinks are.

So far we've learned that we need to:
1.  Grind the feed and place it on saucers the first week or two.
2.  Medicate the water.
3.  Monitor the heat in the surrogator

On the first batch we just lifted the divider about four inches and let them go back and forth.  The divider helped keep some of the heat in the box when we opened it partially.

We hope to release 4 separate batches from each box between now and Sept. 23.

We are learning as we go.  Can't believe it's so addictive.


CAN YOU SHARE SOME PICS
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BigD_N_Cherokee
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2007, 07:19:03 PM »

I'll try to remember to take a camera tomorrow when we move one.

-D
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BigD_N_Cherokee
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« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2007, 06:07:19 PM »

Releasing Bobs:
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BigD_N_Cherokee
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« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2007, 06:08:41 PM »

Inside view:
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BigD_N_Cherokee
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« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2007, 06:10:13 PM »

Outside View
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rsolis
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« Reply #14 on: June 04, 2007, 11:56:50 AM »

good pic  thanks,
they are very helpful  would you share the  dimentions.

How many chick do you place on them? 

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