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Author Topic: To the newbies and wantabies  (Read 13857 times)
Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« on: June 05, 2006, 10:37:11 PM »

This is posted further down, but I felt there would be more input if it was on its own....


Quote
I am wondering how many of the members are actual licensed by their state
DNR/DEC to even have the birds that they are holding in their possession, or the penalties that can be awarded to them if they get caught harboring wild game birds.

Most states require 2 or 3 different classification of licenses. One to own for your own consumption, one to own and release, and the third for, own, release, and the sale of wild game birds and eggs.

What about all the paper work? I am willing to bet all these newcomers donít even realize the paperwork and paper trail involved with the game bird business/hobby aspect. Forms to file if you, release into the wild, sell, eat, or die, and the forms to file when they have births.

I am willing to bet they donít even know that they need an importation permit to receive out of state eggs and or chicks/adults for wild game birds.

Whether raising wild game birds either for hobby, commercial, or release on your own property in most states require a license to harbor wild game birds.

I have had people, in my own State of West Virginia, call and ask me If I wanted a science or 4-H project that they had in hatching quail, pheasant and Chukar. I had to decline the offer since they were not licensed. I cannot receive any wild game bird with in this state without the proper paperwork. I cannot import any wild game bird eggs/chicks/adults without the proper vet certificates and an importation permit.

All the new members here are in for a rude awaking if you have not consulted your local DNR/DEC wildlife section about acquiring and harboring wild game birds. It is only a matter of time before you get caught.

Oh and by the way, most states list game birds as Quail, Pheasants, Partridge, Grouse and all sub species. Even if there isnít a season listed in your state for Chukar, I am willing to bet that the person who purchased 100 birds or so will need some kind of shoot to retrieve or field trial permit either in the regular upland hunting season or when the upland season is closed for the listed bird above.

Even if you are raising the birds for your own use, as for dog training, more then likely even on your own land, thatís right, your own land, will more then likely need a permit to run your dogs on your own birds.

Just remember, that any bird that you release, or escapes, belongs now to the state, and to all the people of your state. You no longer have any invested rights in that bird that you hatched out.

Another thing for you new game bird breeders/members out there, you may be able to eat what you have in your the pen at any time, but remember during the regular legal hunting season, whatever you release, the legal daily limits, and season bag limits are, you must abide by them. If your state says no pheasant hens, and you release hens you canít shoot them, unless you have a special permit to do so during the hunting season, or you are a legal Licensed Shooting Preserve, or have some other permit stating you may shoot hens.

Steve
Pheasant Hollow Farm

« Last Edit: June 05, 2006, 10:38:52 PM by Pheasant Hollow Farm » Logged

Specializing in Manchurian Ring-necked Pheasants and Melanistic Mutant Pheasants for release, propagation and the hunting community. Licensed by the State of WV. DNR# D6-16-16-GF1
CharlieHorse
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2006, 10:59:43 PM »

That is some good info. for those whom don't know. Especially the, "once a bird is released, or escapes it is now the property of the state".

With this worldwide avian flu scare that's going to get everybody by the end of next week, I expect the existing rules and regulations to be enforced more than ever before in the near future. Some states will give you a "release" permit for free. But you still need to get it, free or not.
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2006, 11:12:45 PM »

I guess I am lucky to live in PA. I only need the permit if I am going to raise birds native to PA or found living wild in PA, and if I plan on selling, trading or giving away any birds. Since I do not plan on raising birds native to PA or the USA fot that matter I do not need the permit. I have done my homework, I know the law in my state and I feel if anyone even wants to raise gamebirds they need to do it as well.

mike
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ncffp163
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2006, 12:26:50 AM »

Hi ya'll

In North Carolina, if you propagate gamebirds, you will have a Propagation License ($5.00) to possess gamebirds for either in permanant captivity or for release. But have to have a receipt for eggs/birds stating date, name, address and permit numbers of both parties and to keep records of same. And you have to keep records of sales to others. Everything else is pretty close to what Steve wrote.

Eric
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woodenegg
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2006, 01:55:23 AM »

The state of Alaska requires a permit for a few rare and endangered birds, but not for quail, chukar, ducks, geese or the normal run of pheasant species.  Most of these do not exist in Alaska.  They protect the ptarmigan and grouse, several species of endangered ducks and geese.  Feds say I don't need a permit to have and breed domestic mallards, even if they can fly.  Its kind of nice not to have to deal with all that.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2006, 11:07:42 AM by woodenegg » Logged
magnumhntr
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2006, 05:39:20 AM »

Michigan requires a "Permit to Hold Wildlife in Captivity" permit, which is needed if you raise more than 12 at any given time, bobwhite quail, huns, or ring neck pheasants. Less than 12 you don't need any permits to keep them. But if you intend to breed and hatch you own eggs, keep more than 12 on hand at any given time, or sell any of the listed breeds, then you are required to have the permit, which needs to be renewed every 3 years.

It's actually a pretty painless and easy process, and for a small fee, keeps you legal beagle ;-)
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Chris Morehouse
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Reeves
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2006, 07:06:27 AM »

You know, it never crossed my mind to check in Canada/Provinces to see if any permits are required. I do know they are for migratory birds though. As well as inspected pens for them.
Also know at some big sales here, no permits are asked for on any Quail or Pheasants. Unless listed on CITES ?
I'm going to e-mail a friend that will know.....
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Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2006, 09:37:33 AM »

In the state of WV, prior to even receiving your game farm license you have to have a valid WV Business License. Once you have the business license you then must have the birds prior to even getting the game farm license.

Ya I know, @$$ backwards. You would think that you would be issued the game farm license prior to the receiving of any birds.

Steve
Pheasant Hollow Farm
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Specializing in Manchurian Ring-necked Pheasants and Melanistic Mutant Pheasants for release, propagation and the hunting community. Licensed by the State of WV. DNR# D6-16-16-GF1
drwink
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« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2006, 11:42:02 AM »

Good post Steve
I think I remember reading that the state of Virginia is even tougher than WV.
I researched this myself before getting birds and am in Michigan.
Like Chris said it is pretty painless and the fee isn't all that much. You do have to keep records for listed gamebird species when hatching & releasing. I don't have my book infront of me but Chris didn't mention that there is something that states about a 6 month time period where you can posses birds without a license if you are not keeping them longer than that here.
Having this permit also gives the DNR the right to enter your property at any time for pretty much any reason.

Good thing I have nothing to hide

Wally
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magnumhntr
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« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2006, 02:19:16 PM »

Glad you mentioned that Wally. Yes, you can purchase and keep as many of the regulated species up to 6 months under the Gamebird Release Permit. The catch is that one, the must be purchased, you cannnot hatch your own, and two, at the end of the 6 months they must either be butchered or released, down to the minmum number of 12 which you do not need a permit for.

One thing I do like about michigans program, which I'm sure Wally would agree, is that the rules are spelled out pretty clearly. I don't see alot of loose interpretation of the rules, and getting ahold of the permit specialist in Lansing isn't the hassle I first thought it would be. He has been very puctual in getting back with me, and the DNR has been very professional and helpful when I had questions or concerns.

As for them coming on my land without "reason", I too am glad I have nothing to hide. Makes me glad I gave up growing my "crop" back in high school, lol. ;-)
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Chris Morehouse
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Pheasant Hollow Farm
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« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2006, 02:21:23 PM »

Good post Steve
I think I remember reading that the state of Virginia is even tougher than WV.
I researched this myself before getting birds and am in Michigan.
Like Chris said it is pretty painless and the fee isn't all that much. You do have to keep records for listed gamebird species when hatching & releasing. I don't have my book infront of me but Chris didn't mention that there is something that states about a 6 month time period where you can posses birds without a license if you are not keeping them longer than that here.
Having this permit also gives the DNR the right to enter your property at any time for pretty much any reason.

Good thing I have nothing to hide

Wally

Wally,

The cost here in WV for the calendar year is $10.00. The paperwork required is anything sold/released/hatched/died/eaten/escaped, requires the form to be submitted within 15 days.

Anything sold (Adults/chicks/hatchable eggs) is a three-part form. Buyer get a copy DNR gets a copy and I keep one on file for 3 years. The log pages get handed in at the end of the calendar year when it is license renewal time.

Farm inspections are once a year, usually in mid January. The Officers in the Parkersburg, WV DNR office all know me. The Charleston Office knows me as well. I have fought for regulation changes and got some changes made.

Farm inspection were at one time when ever they felt like it. It is know during your normal business hours, or if they feel a crime has been, or about to be committed any time day or night.

It used to be 20sqft per bird no matter what the bird was, chick/adult/new born. Now it is whatever industry standards are for chicks and new born.

When I had my farm inspection in Jan, I had received a call to set up for this inspection during the week. The phone call was either on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon. I wasnít doing anything and the DNR Officer had pulled the duty for the weekend. So I suggested if you want to come down now and do the inspection, feel free.

I have nothing to hide and the local DNR are always welcomed to stop by my farm.


Steve
Pheasant Hollow Farm
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Specializing in Manchurian Ring-necked Pheasants and Melanistic Mutant Pheasants for release, propagation and the hunting community. Licensed by the State of WV. DNR# D6-16-16-GF1
mainequail
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« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2006, 11:09:58 PM »

Here in Maine the Propagation Permit is $28 for two calendar years. It includes a shooting permit so you can shoot your own (banded) birds anytime of year. Banded and they are yours, not banded, they are wild. Game Wardens do a very brief initial lookover of your property.

A yearly Inventory form is filled out and sales have a special monthly form.

There is also a one calendar year  "importation" permit for $28 for Wild "BIRDS"
This seems to be a loophole that makes no mention of importing EGGS.

Officials here admit they spend very little of their dwindling time/money on enforcement and a trip to the local farm auctions shows that they are correct. Many dog trainers tell me they use  quail/pheasant without permits.

I sell ONLY to someone that provides a copy of their valid Propagation permit, but I give detailed instructions on how to apply for one on my quail for sale website. For me it's just a fun hobby that lets me make enough money to break even on pens, food and quail for myself. I just love watching the little birds hatch and grow.
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yarnlady
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« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2006, 10:43:51 PM »

The state of florida doesn't require any kind of license for button quail raising and keeping for personal use and/or as pets.  So I'm good. =)  It does, however, require you to get a license if you're going to sell anything. It's a pretty expensive license, I think well into the 3 digits.  We're just doing this as a hobby, so we don't need to worry about that.
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novice12
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« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2006, 11:32:28 PM »

I live in IL and if you have a commercial licsense you can do what you want for the most part and its cheap only 20 bucks
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CharlieHorse
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Northern Bobwhites

« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2006, 01:00:17 AM »

Ohio just wants your $40 a year. It's all about the $$$$$$ anyway. I haven't seen or spoken to anyone from the DNR yet.


In the state of WV, prior to even receiving your game farm license you have to have a valid WV Business License. Once you have the business license you then must have the birds prior to even getting the game farm license.

Ya I know, @$$ backwards. You would think that you would be issued the game farm license prior to the receiving of any birds.

Steve
Pheasant Hollow Farm


I know what you mean Steve, WV has some really strange laws. I'm surprised they don't require a permit for living near a mountain/hill.
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