Website Main Page
Forum Main Page

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 04, 2020, 07:06:59 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Buy & Sell Gamebirds online!
Click Here for TQP Auction & Ads
42418 Posts in 6015 Topics by 2375 Members
Latest Member: jg102
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  That Quail Place Forum
|-+  Raising Gamebirds
| |-+  Incubation
| | |-+  Batch of quail eggs incubation started
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Batch of quail eggs incubation started  (Read 8470 times)
pocketsierra
Guest
« on: February 04, 2005, 05:11:18 PM »

I have a batch of 65 Jumbo Brown Coturnix eggs from mail order in the incubator.

The Coturnix hens are quite artistic and the eggs are all different patterns and sizes. One egg is a mystery egg because it is all white. It is possible that it was layed by a Coturnix hen, but it just might be a Bobwhite egg that got in one of my orders by mistake.

I have a Brower TopHatch Incubator. It seems to be holding temperature at 99.5 and humidity was at 56% this morning. The autoturner is neat to watch. I have eggs in four of the eight sections. Every once in a while the eggs will shift slightly. This morning, one egg had jumped a fence, so I reshuffled some of the eggs.  

Further updates as events warrant.
Logged
quailking
Guest
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2005, 03:13:24 PM »

The coturnix eggs will be almost all spotted but its not uncommon to see a white one or even a blueish one.. I call them ghost eggs..

Try to keep the humity up around 58-60% if possible, especially days 16-18 while hatching, it will keep the chicks from stickin in the egg
Logged
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2005, 03:41:02 PM »

Update.

Since then, the humidity has been 59-60%. I've added water a few times. I have practiced raising the humidity for those last three days and I will need to add some rags or sponges for that. The Brower turns eggs on their side on a rack and the turner can be disengaged to make it a hatcher.  

The temperature is holding very well. I have to get used to the fact that my digital thermometer will show 98.2 while the mercury one will show 99.5. I found in my trials that the digital thermometer was reading low while the other was close to the temperature of the egg.

The economy candler arrived from Cutter Supply yesterday. I tried it out on a few eggs. The white egg was easiest to candle and showed healthy veins.
Some eggs are brown enough that I am not sure I will be able to tell much in them. In a medium tan egg, I saw veins and movement. This gave me hope that at least some of them are very much alive.

It was only day 5. I plan to do exhaustive candling on Day 8(Friday).  Does anyone have pictures from candling quail eggs? I've seen some from chicken eggs.
Logged
quailking
Guest
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2005, 05:05:45 PM »

Remember that while you are candeling they are not in the incubator staying warm.. some of the darker eggs are almost impossible to candle.. I would wait till about day 10-12 and candle and remove any without growth and try not to remove them from the incubator any more than you have too, they want to be at a constant temp, just lifting the lid will throw that all off..

Good luck
Logged
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2005, 11:52:37 AM »

Sounds like good advice re: waiting to candle. I'll be waiting probably till day 12 or maybe even 14. I'll stagger it so I don't open the incubator too many times in one day.  

I couldn't see much of anything on Day 8 on a sample. The only one that looked like it was making progress was the ghost egg. I counted another 14 eggs that I could draw no conclusions on. Some say that a maglite or an economy candler can work on Coutrnix eggs, but I found neither to work very well.  

Space in my incubator is not at a premium this time. Only half of the sections are full. But I don't want the yolkers going bad and spreading any bacteria to the others. If I can't figure out more effective candling, then I will just be going by smells.

It doesn't look so far that I will have a very good hatch this time. This is mail order so I didn't expect more than 50%, but even that seems high now. I will want to learn some lessons for next month.
Logged
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2005, 05:18:00 PM »

It's now day 14 of the hatch.

Tonight I will be disengaging the turner and adding sponges to raise the humidity up to 75% or so. Then I will be leaving the lid on faithfully for the next three days.

In spot candling yesterday, some still seemed unreadable because of dark shells, however a few seemed dark and full with a little bit of movement inside. The one ghost egg is still the best one to tell anything on.

The rubbermaid brooder is ready to go for Monday morning.    

My hopeful estimate for the hatch is 16 out of 65, based on largely inconclusive candling results and my non statistically accurate knowledge of statistics.

Nathan
Logged
RedOakGamebirds
Administrator
Expert Member
*****

Karma: 87
Offline Offline

Posts: 323

WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2005, 10:30:41 PM »

Coturnix Quail are very prolific layers as goes the same with hatching.  This is one reason why many people raise them.  It's always interesting to hear results from others such as yourself.  We all learn from each others mistakes.  Out of 65 eggs during a good laying season you should have nearly 95% fertile if not more.  This time of year and with shipping may deter your hatch as you expect but I wouldnt be surprised to have 40 or better hatch out of the 65.  Candling takes alot of practice but can easily be done with all types of eggs.  I wouldnt even recommend it at all if you have the room in the incubator unless you want the experience in doing it.  Also depending on your area your humidity may already be adequate enough for your hatch.  Its been unusually wet here this year so we add very little water if any except for the last 3 days.  This past setting of 1,000 eggs we used no water at all.  Also every 1/2 degree increase during incubation will usually raise your hatch times by 12 hours.  Good luck on your hatch and let us know how it turns out for you.  You can also candle your eggs by temperature if the conditions are right using a laser temperature gun  :wink:  But thats another story.....


Larry
Logged

________________________________
Red Oak Game Birds
Charlotte County, Virginia
http://www.redoakgamebirds.com
We manufacture egg shipping foam!
Pollorum/Typhoid/Avian Free
NPIP 52-186
Member NAGA and Virginia Game Bird Asociation
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2005, 11:43:23 PM »

It's night of Day 16. No pipping or cheeping here yet. If there is none cheeping or pipping by tommorrow night, I'll expect that the hatch will be a bit late.

Humidity is at 73% +-5%. Doesn't seem to get higher than that.

Larry, I'm interested in your method for candling eggs by temperature.

Nathan
Logged
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2005, 12:32:04 AM »

After seeing no previous activity, I found one bird completely hatched at 11 am this morning.

I've had various church meetings throughout the day and seem to find more every time I return.

There are 9 out and about as of tonight. There are pips on a few other eggs. The pips are small enough that I don't think I notice them all.

I expect there to be more by the morning. I'm keeping the lid on faithfully. I will open it once tonight to take out the dry ones and do anything else necessary.

The birds are curious and exploring the place. When I added water through a drain hole, two were interested in it - not for drinking, but for a quick shower. I see why they reccomend non drowning waterers.

Nathan
Logged
quailer370
Expert Member
*****

Karma: 8
Offline Offline

Posts: 163

« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2005, 12:51:14 AM »

:) sounds like you're getting a good hatch.  i have a comment to make about the waterers.  a really convienent way to make a standard waterer (with the base that screws onto the dish) safe for the chicks is to just plop a couple of glass marbles in the water.  the chicks cant drown but they can still drink, they have fun pecking the marbles (at no risk to them because the marbles are too big to eat), and most importantly it makes it look pretty  :lol: good luck with your quail!

-quailer370
Logged

life's like a bucket of wood shavings, except when the shavings are in a pail...then life's like a PAIL of wood shavings :D
penny's dad
Guest
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2005, 05:58:34 AM »

GO ON P.S. I LOVE A GOOD HATCH :D    P.D.
Logged
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2005, 02:28:43 PM »

I count 23 hatched so far with more possible. Other eggs have cracks and pips.

Most are now in the brooder box (under the bed rubbermaid type container). I was worried about the temperature because they seem to want to cluster under the heat lamp. It is a 150 watt ceramic heat bulb. However, after a while, some will venture out and explore.

They haven't tried the water. I've seen some peck at food. I hope they will get more interested in the water soon. I actually splurged on got the non drowning base and have pedialyte in it.  

Some will come to me if I wiggle a finger at them.

One looks like it might be spraddle legged. The rest look healthy.
Logged
penny's dad
Guest
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2005, 06:27:02 PM »

HEY NATHAN,  LET ME KNOW HOW THAT CERAMIC BULB WORKS I SAW THEM THE OTHER NITE ON LINE. DO YOU HAVE IT HOOKED UP TO A   REASTAT  "I DON'T THINK I SPELLED THAT RIGHT" THEY SAY THATS THE WAY TO GO SO YOU CAN CONTROL THE TEMP. OR CAN YOU HOOK IT UP TO A THERMOSTAT? GOOD LUCK ON THAT HATCH.I LOVE A GOOD HATCH    :D   P.D.
Logged
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2005, 10:47:35 PM »

There are now 26 that have hatched. Things have gone well.

There are pips on many other eggs, at least 10.  A few have even been cut around, but none are doing anything right now. I'll be giving those eggs more time, but I wonder if any are giving up or dying and if I did something wrong to cause that.  

Humidity has been as high as 78%. I believe it has been high enough throughout the hatching.

My ceramic light has no thermostat, but it seems to need to be on all the time to be barely hot enough. I'm judging this by the temperature of 95deg. There is no thermometer in there now that the chicks are there, but sometimes they seem to spend too much time under the heat lamp.
Logged
pocketsierra
Guest
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2005, 01:22:26 PM »

One more hatched overnight, so now there are 27.

One of the eggs that has pipped  and is cut nearly all the way around cheeps at me, a good sign. Other pipped eggs are probably dead in the shell, but some may yet hatch.  

The temperature spiked yesterday afternoon when the incubator got direct  sunlight. It was downstairs, and in a rare occurrence, there was a sunny day in the Pacific Northwest. I quickly closed the blinds after the digital thermometer read 102.5. I'm pretty sure that was a factor that stopped the progress of many pipped eggs. If that is the case, it is preventable in the future.

Several birds have found the food and water. A whole bunch of the birds will come to me if I put my hand in the other end of the brooder box.

Three year old Sierra loves to hold a bird and does well at it.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!