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Author Topic: Quail release not very successful  (Read 22691 times)
Pheasant Hollow Farm
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EST. 2001 Owner/Operator Located in Slate, WV

« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2008, 03:23:26 PM »

What about a different approach ?
Maybe they should be around humans, dogs etc.  Scare the birds with noise everytime you go into there cage making them scared of people.  (not to get them hurt though ) Maybe a remote toy with a coon skin cover chasing them around just a little.   Just a though, but I could be nuts.  Do I need  s85 ?

Good thinkin'!     ^-^  You might be on to something...............

Just go in there, chase them around and scare the livin' daylights out of 'em!!  Grap a couple and let 'em scream bloody murder.....maybe even break a couple legs and wings to make sure your message sinks in?   I'd even go as far as getting naked and slipping into a coyote hide, complete with ears and jaws, bite a couple of them on the wings and hang on for dear life while it thrashes around trying to get away.....screaming all the while you're making examples out of them for the others to see.  Maybe add some wings for the full "falcon" effect while I'm at it?   They'll be scared $hitless of their own shadows by the time I'm done.  End result........Pure 100% wild birds.   ^-^

Super Genius!!   

 a31




 j45

I'd even spend the gas money to see this one in action j41

Steve
Pheasant Hollow Farm
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Specializing in Manchurian Ring-necked Pheasants and Melanistic Mutant Pheasants for release, propagation and the hunting community. Licensed by the State of WV. DNR# D6-16-16-GF1
Reeves
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« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2008, 03:55:29 PM »

Hey Chuck....how much smoke from fires have you been breathing ?

 s020
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CharlieHorse
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Northern Bobwhites

« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2008, 05:17:10 PM »

I've never inhaled the smoke from a grass fire!!   

 j4     

 s020
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CharlieHorse
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Northern Bobwhites

« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2008, 06:04:15 PM »

Skipper,

  After rereading your post.......part of your problem is that you released way too many birds in a single location.  They'll stick together after being released, sort of a "follow the leader" kinda deal.  If a few keep moving on out of the country, the others will follow.  I always release around 10 in any given location (spring/summer releases).  You should have been able to make about 15 release sites throughout your property with that amount of birds.  If they want to group back together, they'll have to do it on their own. Plus, by releasing that amount of birds in a single local, the chances of being spotted and the chances of a predator of any kind catching one/some/many is greatly increased. The ground would look like it was moving with that many birds moving in any given area..............easy to spot.
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skipper3905
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« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2008, 10:05:31 PM »

Charliehorse,

That is likely a good idea. I will release in smaller groups next time. I have about 300 going out in about 3 weeks. May try some at six or seven weeks also.

I did see 7 of them beside one of the feeders I put out about a week ago. Been looking for them since but no luck.
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jbird
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Gods Creatures are for everyone to enjoy

« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2008, 10:03:54 PM »

Charliehorse, and  Steve,    Your replies were great.   I laughed so hard I almost got sick.  Thanks guys for making my day.  Without a sense of humor Jack would be a dull boy and I've been a dull person all my life maybe it's time for a change????    j45
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skipper3905
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« Reply #21 on: December 13, 2008, 03:17:51 PM »

Just sort of a update on quail release I've been trying. Just about zero luck so far. I released over  1,000 through the year and occasionally see a few. No more than five in a covey and I suspect that is not enough for any group to survive the winter. Released at different ages, different locations, different times of the year, different amounts in each release. Just no luck to speak of. Still improving habitat though and will try again starting this spring.

Got pens in remote area, almost no exposure to people before release. Kept traps out and keeping predator somewhat controled. Have quite a few big fields (with proper cover at proper distance) but had some big trees still in the fileds. Think hawks might be nailing them from the trees so removing them. See a few hawks but no more than when I was a kid in East Texas and quail were common.

Have 7 large pens, good cover in them. Lots of seeding plants. They even get some bugs. Rotate the pens.

When I come across released birds I see they don't fly like wild quail. Too low and burst out too late. Can't be good for predator avoidance. During nesting season I never heard a "bob-white" mating call. I could hear them, just never the mating call. Assume that means none were mating or making the effort. 

I know chicks in wild just eat bugs first two weeks. Somehow I have it in my mind that is a important difference between pen and wild birds. 27% gamebird starter still does not have the protein power of bugs. Also could be the exoskeleton of bug plays a role. Both maybe. Possible some effect on brain development first two weeks. Have not read that anywhere but a big difference between natural state and pen raised. Going to try mealy worm supplement and will see if that makes a difference. Somehow, there is a wired difference between wild and pen quail beyond human exposure. Flight characteristics, egg laying, coveying, etc. Not a genetic thing, eggs from wild and then pen raised display same problems. 

Going to try some different forbs and grains this year. Egyptian wheat looks good, gets up over 8'. Had some out from a gamebird seed mix I used but I think will be good for a whole field. Found a good strain of field corn, Yellow Dent, will try that also. Have quite a bit of wild peas that should volunteer this year. Of course have ragweed and will put milo out again. Food and habitat just not the problem. Going to start pheasant release this year also. Got some Whitewing crosses for brooders that seem pretty wild, for sure a lot more wild  than the quail. Hope I have better luck with them than quail.
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CharlieHorse
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Northern Bobwhites

« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2008, 12:29:01 AM »

Thanks a bunch for the great info from your first hand experience.  If only you can figure out what's happening to them.  I believe that alot of what I have released moved on down the road, based on what I've heard from people in the area.

 s98  and good luck!


 s87
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skipper3905
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« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2008, 10:26:35 PM »

Charliehorse,

Have had a few neighbors mention they had seen one or two at a time. There was a real covey at one of my neighbors house but they disappeared a few months back. I actually saw two today but they were the first in a week or so. One flew well, the other I could have kicked. Problem is just two together in the winter. Not promising.

I think I am going to release about 15 or 20 tomorrow. These are about 25 weeks old, too old. Winter is a bad release time. Releasing at the right age and the right time of the year has not done me a lot of good. Will see if doing things wrong works any better.
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skipper3905
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« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2008, 09:39:51 PM »

Saw the first large covey of quail on my land today. Was on my track hoe pushing down a couple of trees I thought were just hawk perches. Looked down and saw three walking beside track hoe. Killed engine and watched. Saw five more, then three more. Probably a few more I missed. Got out and walked toward them. They did not flush like a wild covey and when they flew they flew lower than wild quail. I have released a number of Georgias and regular northerns. These were all northerns. The quail I released in this area were northerns, about four months ago. I did release some 30 Georgias in the general area today. They were all over 28 weeks and doubt if they will make it. Very good habitat area. If they do, that will tell me something.

Very happy to see a full covey, nevertheless. I now suspect there are other coveys in the area that I have missed. 

If there is anyone out there trying pheasant and quail introduction or knows someone else that is.  I sure would appreciate it if you would PM me. I have several ideas on this that I would like to bounce around. Might save me some time, might get good ideas from others, outside chance I could help someone. This is about the most active board on gamebirds I have found but mostly people that seem to have become friends over time and and mostly general chat. Nothing at all wrong with that. Just not much information on introduction release. I come on this forum from time to time and should have made notes on those that I could tell have a interest in this subject, but I didn't.
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wildergamebirds
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« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2008, 12:14:57 AM »


  My first thought was that the ones you saw were also too old when released.  Possibly not, but definitely too tame.  They usually stay pretty wild, up to 4-6 weeks, no matter how they are raised.

  The real benefit of planted birds, is the next Springs' hatch.  And even more, in the second season crop.  Protect them from predators, as much as possible, running hounds are the most effective, since even the ones that get away may not return, if food is plentiful on neighboring properties.  But do everything legally possible, and concider everything.
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skipper3905
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« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2009, 11:46:14 PM »

Some more success on quail release. A neighbor called me today to look at a covey of quail that had been coming to feeders in their yard. A very large covey, maybe 25 birds, all Georgia, large and very healty looking. I'm pretty sure these were birds released right out of my flight pens about 10 weeks ago. These birds had to be around 30 weeks old then. Pretty surprising they have made it.

Two other neighbors serveral miles away have seen at least two coveys. I don't know what release they came from or whether they were Northerns or Georgias. Nevertheless that is four coveys I am aware of now. I am sure there are more.

I am not sure how many I have released this year. Could be 700. I think I may have 13% or 14% success rate so far. If that is true, I am pretty happy. Of course, no idea how many will survive the winter or if any will propagate in the spring.

Come spring I will be releasing more.





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kolby
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« Reply #27 on: January 21, 2009, 04:48:56 PM »

Let a bunch of adult quail go in the spring they will go to nest.  If possable let some breeding take place in your pen then release them.  This will help fertilize all the female
even if some thing happens to the male
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skipper3905
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« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2009, 01:49:02 PM »

Kolby,

I am going to do that. Everything I have read says must release 5-7 weeks old. I think there is something to that but now that I actually see some of my old birds make it (30+ weeks old) I am thinking they may have a chance also. Very few have survived regardless of age but I expected that.

I have 15 prs of Georgias in rollout pens now. Plan to start releasing young birds in spring also.
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kolby
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« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2009, 05:43:08 PM »

I have read about the 6-7 week releasing too.   But in my yard I always let go adult Bobs early May because I have picked my breeders and let the rest go.   This is far from ideal Bob habitat but every yr late Aug-sept. a brood of bobs about 8-10 wk old
shows up.  No native Bobs around my area in CT. 
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